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OBD 1 faults check through the SRS , ABS and Tyre pressure indicators , using error codes


Asanka Pubudu
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Is this method right or wrong?

Also i couldn't finds OBD 1 SRS,ABS and Tyre pressure indicators fault codes list.

 

Reading ABS codes

 

Turn the ignition on.

Connect the leads "TC" and "E1" of the DLC1 connector.

Remove the jumper from the "WA" and "WB" terminals.

After 4 seconds, read the code for the number of flashes of the ABS indicator.

Remove the jumper from the terminals "TC" and "E1".

Set the jumper on the "WA" and "WB" terminals.

Resetting ABS codes

 

Turn the ignition on.

Bring the conclusions of "TC" and "E1"

Press the brake pedal eight or more times in the interval of three seconds.

The indicator should output the normal code (flashing 2 times per second).

Turn the ignition off.

Remove the jumper from the terminals "TC" and "E1".

Make sure that the ABS indicator goes out.

The SRS (Toyota) self-diagnosis codes are read in the same way as the number of "SRS" indicator flashes with the closed terminals "TC" - "E1". Erasing codes must occur when the ignition is switched off. If the codes are saved, a cleaning procedure must be carried out.

 

The tire pressure monitoring system provides its own self-diagnosis. The codes are read in the standard way for Toyot's by the number of indicator flashes with the ignition on and the closed terminals "TC" and "E1". Removal of codes is carried out in the same way as deleting the codes of the ABS system.

 

 

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44 minutes ago, Asanka Pubudu said:

Is this method right or wrong?

Also i couldn't finds OBD 1 SRS,ABS and Tyre pressure indicators fault codes list.

 

Reading ABS codes

 

Turn the ignition on.

Connect the leads "TC" and "E1" of the DLC1 connector.

Remove the jumper from the "WA" and "WB" terminals.

After 4 seconds, read the code for the number of flashes of the ABS indicator.

Remove the jumper from the terminals "TC" and "E1".

Set the jumper on the "WA" and "WB" terminals.

Resetting ABS codes

 

Turn the ignition on.

Bring the conclusions of "TC" and "E1"

Press the brake pedal eight or more times in the interval of three seconds.

The indicator should output the normal code (flashing 2 times per second).

Turn the ignition off.

Remove the jumper from the terminals "TC" and "E1".

Make sure that the ABS indicator goes out.

The SRS (Toyota) self-diagnosis codes are read in the same way as the number of "SRS" indicator flashes with the closed terminals "TC" - "E1". Erasing codes must occur when the ignition is switched off. If the codes are saved, a cleaning procedure must be carried out.

 

The tire pressure monitoring system provides its own self-diagnosis. The codes are read in the standard way for Toyot's by the number of indicator flashes with the ignition on and the closed terminals "TC" and "E1". Removal of codes is carried out in the same way as deleting the codes of the ABS system.

 

 

Each car (brand, model and even YOM) sometimes have different processes; but this process sounds particularly wacky and I doubt it will work. (Give it a try though, but I'll be quite suprised if it works.) Your best bet may be to just buy a cheap bluetooth OBD reader off eBay or Amazon, and connect to it via your phone through the dozen or so free apps available for andriod or apple...

Edited by Kavvz
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First of all @Ted, stop misleading the guy. Best to stay quiet if you don't know something. Searching for an oscilloscope and asking the manufacturer for signalling patterns is something you can do at your own leisure.

@Asanka Pubudu what you have posted here is a diagnostics procedure for Toyotas made in USA or made for the US market. Japanese domestic market cars (most cars in Sri Lanka), use JOBD (which is a version of OBD-II with a different signalling protocol).

What is the tool you are using for diagnostics? If you are using one of those eBay-bought scanners, then it doesn't work for most JDM cars (excluding Mazdas). Also what is your car? We'll be in a better position to help if you tell us some more info.

This is an old discussion on the same topic. The pics are missing, but you can extract some info out of it:

http://autolanka.com/forums/topic/14674-diy-scan-your-own-car/

 

 

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6 hours ago, Crosswind said:

First of all @Ted, stop misleading the guy. Best to stay quiet if you don't know something. Searching for an oscilloscope and asking the manufacturer for signalling patterns is something you can do at your own leisure.

@Asanka Pubudu what you have posted here is a diagnostics procedure for Toyotas made in USA or made for the US market. Japanese domestic market cars (most cars in Sri Lanka), use JOBD (which is a version of OBD-II with a different signalling protocol).

What is the tool you are using for diagnostics? If you are using one of those eBay-bought scanners, then it doesn't work for most JDM cars (excluding Mazdas). Also what is your car? We'll be in a better position to help if you tell us some more info.

This is an old discussion on the same topic. The pics are missing, but you can extract some info out of it:

http://autolanka.com/forums/topic/14674-diy-scan-your-own-car/

 

 

@Crosswind good info.?

 I for one am glad I read through your post above: There's lots to learn there - on many fronts! Also, good link to the previous thread: There's so many little automotive nuggets of info on Autolanka...you just need to know where to look! 

(Infact its quite possible that it is because of that very thread that I bought my first bluetooth OBD2 reader off ebay!  :D )

Edited by Kavvz
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3 hours ago, Ted said:

My Dear @Crosswind,

I think it is you who have totally gone mad. There are no successful scanners available for OBD I. Please talk only if you know anything. Toyota has not declared scanners to find fault codes for OBD I. It is the bulb sequence (when TE1 and E1 connected) that gives the error code and it is only few number of errors in OBD I unlike OBD II where there are more than 100 errors. In every Toyota OBD I repair manual there are no scanners to be connected for read parameters it is only the oscilloscope and the voltmeter to read them. I think you know very little in electronics industry, that even a Grade 5 Student knows that mili second scale oscilloscopes are available in the online market just for 40 -50 bucks. 

For your information I am publishing how such readings are tested for both EFI ECU and ABS ECU in OBD I toyota models. If you don't know anything much shut the f**k up.

Attched first pic is for EFI parameter readings.

Attached send and third pic are for ABS parameter readings.

Dear @Asanka Pubudu

Don't waste your money to buy an OBD I scanner to read fault codes. You can easily do that by connecting TE1 and E1 (in ECU) OR Tc and E1 ( in ABS) short and count the Engine alarm bulb sequence. In internet you can find what is meant by the fault code. From time to time ( from 1985 to 2000) and from model to model there are slight changes in fault code meanings so better you find the code set relevant to your model.

 

Untitled.png

93714054_528106027742500_3568449702158401536_n.jpg

93855270_952315961905745_4418569965083295744_n.jpg

 @Ted I was the one who (mistakenly) suggested he use a scanner- I didn't realize the poster was asking about OB1 error codes and not OBD2 etc. My mistake and my apologies to all concerned! 

Edited by Kavvz
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  • -1
17 minutes ago, Kavvz said:

 @Ted I was the one who (mistakenly) suggested he use a scanner- I didn't realize the poster was asking about OB1 error codes and not OBD2 etc. My mistake and my apologies to all concerned! 

Dear @Kavvz, OKAY my friend..

BDW Could you please remove the negative vote (if you made) to my first comment?

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3 hours ago, Asanka Pubudu said:

Is this method right or wrong?

Also i couldn't finds OBD 1 SRS,ABS and Tyre pressure indicators fault codes list.

 

Reading ABS codes

 

Turn the ignition on.

Connect the leads "TC" and "E1" of the DLC1 connector.

Remove the jumper from the "WA" and "WB" terminals.

After 4 seconds, read the code for the number of flashes of the ABS indicator.

Remove the jumper from the terminals "TC" and "E1".

Set the jumper on the "WA" and "WB" terminals.

Resetting ABS codes

 

Turn the ignition on.

Bring the conclusions of "TC" and "E1"

Press the brake pedal eight or more times in the interval of three seconds.

The indicator should output the normal code (flashing 2 times per second).

Turn the ignition off.

Remove the jumper from the terminals "TC" and "E1".

Make sure that the ABS indicator goes out.

The SRS (Toyota) self-diagnosis codes are read in the same way as the number of "SRS" indicator flashes with the closed terminals "TC" - "E1". Erasing codes must occur when the ignition is switched off. If the codes are saved, a cleaning procedure must be carried out.

 

The tire pressure monitoring system provides its own self-diagnosis. The codes are read in the standard way for Toyot's by the number of indicator flashes with the ignition on and the closed terminals "TC" and "E1". Removal of codes is carried out in the same way as deleting the codes of the ABS system.

 

 

IN OBD1 systems specially toyota, there are no common diag socket to show error codes of all the subsystems in addition to EFI and ABS. In fact those days the electronics were not as advanced as today, that some errors are not programmed to monitor and hence not given. Actually what we have to do is probe an oscilloscope to the outputs and check for the manufacturer recommended signal pattern. 

ABS and SRS give errors from their controlling modules in OBD era. But I doubt Tire Pressure sensor would be connected to the central diag system. I think for that you need to check the performance tests from voltmeter and oscilloscope using the manufac manual. This does not say EFI ECU, ABS ECU do not have such performance tests to be done with osci and volt meter. There are lots of tests in OBD1 to be done. If you are interested in first off I recommend to find your repair manual and check.

Edited by Ted
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4 hours ago, Crosswind said:

First of all @Ted, stop misleading the guy. Best to stay quiet if you don't know something. Searching for an oscilloscope and asking the manufacturer for signalling patterns is something you can do at your own leisure.

@Asanka Pubudu what you have posted here is a diagnostics procedure for Toyotas made in USA or made for the US market. Japanese domestic market cars (most cars in Sri Lanka), use JOBD (which is a version of OBD-II with a different signalling protocol).

What is the tool you are using for diagnostics? If you are using one of those eBay-bought scanners, then it doesn't work for most JDM cars (excluding Mazdas). Also what is your car? We'll be in a better position to help if you tell us some more info.

This is an old discussion on the same topic. The pics are missing, but you can extract some info out of it:

http://autolanka.com/forums/topic/14674-diy-scan-your-own-car/

 

 

My Dear @Crosswind,

I think it is you who have totally gone mad. There are no successful scanners available for OBD I. Please talk only if you know anything. Toyota has not declared scanners to find fault codes for OBD I. It is the bulb sequence (when TE1 and E1 connected) that gives the error code and it is only few number of errors in OBD I unlike OBD II where there are more than 100 errors. In every Toyota OBD I repair manual there are no scanners to be connected for read parameters it is only the oscilloscope and the voltmeter to read them. I think you know very little in electronics industry, that even a Grade 5 Student knows that mili second scale oscilloscopes are available in the online market just for 40 -50 bucks. 

For your information I am publishing how such readings are tested for both EFI ECU and ABS ECU in OBD I toyota models. If you don't know anything much shut the f**k up.

Attched first pic is for EFI parameter readings.

Attached send and third pic are for ABS parameter readings.

Dear @Asanka Pubudu

Don't waste your money to buy an OBD I scanner to read fault codes. You can easily do that by connecting TE1 and E1 (in ECU) OR Tc and E1 ( in ABS) short and count the Engine alarm bulb sequence. In internet you can find what is meant by the fault code. From time to time ( from 1985 to 2000) and from model to model there are slight changes in fault code meanings so better you find the code set relevant to your model.

 

Untitled.png

93714054_528106027742500_3568449702158401536_n.jpg

93855270_952315961905745_4418569965083295744_n.jpg

Edited by Ted
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