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How often engine oil should be replaced ? for Toyota synthetic motor oil


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  • 1 month later...
On 6/18/2020 at 6:20 PM, iRage said:

Hmmm...5000km does seem rather short for fully synthetic oils...usually even for severe usage the recommendation is about 7500-8000km whilst normal ranges from 10,000-15,000km. 

I change engine oil every 5000km in my chr 1.2l using above mentioned 0w-20 synthetic oil. Is it not necessary to change oil that often? ( car is primarily use in Kurunegala traffic. It is not bad as the Colombo traffic.) Is it better to use 5w-30 instead of 0w-20? 

I pump 92 octane to the chr. Some guys say that it need 95 and some say that it need 92. 

Is it perfectly fine with 92 or it need 95 or is it better to use 95 octane every once in month or two month etc.etc..

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59 minutes ago, Sadeepa Dilhara said:

I change engine oil every 5000km in my chr 1.2l using above mentioned 0w-20 synthetic oil. Is it not necessary to change oil that often? ( car is primarily use in Kurunegala traffic. It is not bad as the Colombo traffic.) Is it better to use 5w-30 instead of 0w-20? 

I pump 92 octane to the chr. Some guys say that it need 95 and some say that it need 92. 

Is it perfectly fine with 92 or it need 95 or is it better to use 95 octane every once in month or two month etc.etc..

Well..i dunno....if you are stuck in Colombo like traffic...in hot temperatures..then the heavier oil would be better as it does not thin out as much (same in cases of driving long distance fast driving in hot temperatures :D) Note that this might slightly reduce your fuel efficiency as the fluid resistance within the engine is increased....but I do not think Kurunegala is that bad in terms of traffic or temperature is it ? 

Theoretically..the CHR will run on 92 Octane. The question is the quality of the fuel and any engine cleaning additives that the fuel may have. If the quality is bad, it really does not matter what the octane rating is..it is bad for your car. Then there are additives...some fuels have de-carbonizing or water chasing additives and additives etc..to improve the condition of the fuel and the burn process. Some say that 95 Octane petrol in SL has it and 92 Oct fuel does not...so it is up to you to decide if the additives are actually beneficial for you. You will have to consider the carbonising and injector clogging issues that seem to be popping up in SL with the CHR (dont forget this seems to be coming up in cars that use both octane of fuels). 

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1 hour ago, iRage said:

Well..i dunno....if you are stuck in Colombo like traffic...in hot temperatures..then the heavier oil would be better as it does not thin out as much (same in cases of driving long distance fast driving in hot temperatures :D) Note that this might slightly reduce your fuel efficiency as the fluid resistance within the engine is increased....but I do not think Kurunegala is that bad in terms of traffic or temperature is it ? 

Theoretically..the CHR will run on 92 Octane. The question is the quality of the fuel and any engine cleaning additives that the fuel may have. If the quality is bad, it really does not matter what the octane rating is..it is bad for your car. Then there are additives...some fuels have de-carbonizing or water chasing additives and additives etc..to improve the condition of the fuel and the burn process. Some say that 95 Octane petrol in SL has it and 92 Oct fuel does not...so it is up to you to decide if the additives are actually beneficial for you. You will have to consider the carbonising and injector clogging issues that seem to be popping up in SL with the CHR (dont forget this seems to be coming up in cars that use both octane of fuels). 

Can you recommend me some good fuel additives (available in Sri Lanka) to minimize above mentioned issue.

Is it not necessary to change engine oil every 5000km.(0w 20 synthetic oil.)

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36 minutes ago, Sadeepa Dilhara said:

Can you recommend me some good fuel additives (available in Sri Lanka) to minimize above mentioned issue.

Is it not necessary to change engine oil every 5000km.(0w 20 synthetic oil.)

Synthetic oils will have a much longer service life....typically depending on the use for the vehicle anything between 7500 - 10000 kms. the 3000-5000ish service interval is mainly for mineral oils which tend to break down sooner. Semi-synthetics (which quite a few oils are these days) fall somewhere in between.

Well...before you go about running and putting additives, you should know that the ultimae cause for the injector clogs and carbon build up in SL is not entirely known. So putting the additive is not guaranteed to not cause it. But then again...putting a additive/fuel cleaner in to the tank once or twice a year with your oil change cycle would not help either I suppose. Now remember...this is not going to totally clean your injectors but regular usage can seem to help keep the injectors generally clean (so it can just be a matter of prolonging the issue rather solving it). Also, if you do use an injector cleaner it has to be done just before you service the car (as an oil change is needed). You get Wurth injector cleaners which seem to be decent. Also  , be warned..some of these injector cleaners require you to reuse it every few thousand km. So if you get in to the schedule for he injector cleaner you may have to adjust your oil change interval to fit that (usually the injector cleaner intervals are synchronized with oil change intervals). If you use an injector cleaner with a 5000km reuse recommendation and you follow that..that means you will have to change your oil every 5000km; so you might as well change to a good mineral oil (there is nothing wrong with a good mineral oil)

Putting 95 Oct petrol every other month or so is not going to help you achieve anything.

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21 hours ago, Sadeepa Dilhara said:

I pump 92 octane to the chr. Some guys say that it need 95 and some say that it need 92. 

Is it perfectly fine with 92 or it need 95 or is it better to use 95 octane every once in month or two month etc.etc..

Three known C-HR's (three of my friends...)

1. YOM 2018 - Very smart guy so Using 95 Oct always ?? - Millage 28,000 km - running mainly in Colombo - The injector blockage problem has arrived recently (you may read the case here)

2. YOM 2019 - He is just like me so always using 92 Oct (he never pump 95) ?? - Millage 30,000 km - running Colombo Gampaha and Katunayaka area - No injector issue yet

3. YOM 2016 - Using 95 mainly but occasionally 92 - Millage 42,000 km - running in Colombo - No injector issue yet

 

 

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1 hour ago, gayanath said:

Three known C-HR's (three of my friends...)

1. YOM 2018 - Very smart guy so Using 95 Oct always ?? - Millage 28,000 km - running mainly in Colombo - The injector blockage problem has arrived recently (you may read the case here)

2. YOM 2019 - He is just like me so always using 92 Oct (he never pump 95) ?? - Millage 30,000 km - running Colombo Gampaha and Katunayaka area - No injector issue yet

3. YOM 2016 - Using 95 mainly but occasionally 92 - Millage 42,000 km - running in Colombo - No injector issue yet

 

 

@vitz pumps 92 into his 2018 C-HR too and has carbon deposits in his tailpipe more than my 5-year old 95-pumped Lancer

 

So I'm guessing that octane rating of the fuel doesn't have much, if anything, to do with this carbon deposits blocking fuel injectors

Edited by Hyaenidae
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@gayanathWhat do you think about this case? Is it a issue with low quality fuel in Sri Lanka.

I change my mind to use 95. It is not because of octane rating. But I guess 95 octane petrol contains low sulfer percentage and some useful additives. (Is it worth?)

@iRage, @gayanathCan those injectors live with sulfer percentage or any other parameters of 92 octane fuel in Sri Lanka without any problem according to Toyota.?

Edited by Sadeepa Dilhara
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I believe the fuel station you pump has a big role here. Make sure to stick to one trustworthy station. I always get the service of Lauxxs (kandy) with the presumption that being a new construction their storage facility is better. 

 

One thing I noticed recently. I used 92 always for my Eclipse cross without any trouble (in Chr too, 38,000 km, no injector problem faced yet though some carbon deposits in the tail pipe). With all these horror stories of injector clogging,  recently I pumped 95, believe me i feel quite a difference in the power when 95 is used in the Eclipse cross.  But, the Chr is the workhorse of ours, 92 is always used without much a choice of the fuel station....with 0W20 engine oil changed in every 7500 km.

Edited by vitz
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To be honest...it seems like no matter what we come up with theoretically for the cause of all these weird things there always is something that throws them out the window. To be honest..I think someone needs to do a proper composition analysis of the fuels we import in to the country (rather than taking importers word for it). This effects all the cars and the environment itself if the fuel is pretty crap.

As for the better performance...it could be any additives that the 95 actually has that the 92 does not. Or it could just be a placebo effect.

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P

4 hours ago, iRage said:

Or it could just be a placebo effect.

My money is on the placebo effect...as if it isn't a high compression engine / doesn't have a high compression design then with either 92 or 95 Octane its making the same amount of power.

Edited by Kavvz
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On 8/16/2020 at 8:41 AM, Kavvz said:

 

P

My money is on the placebo effect...as if it isn't a high compression engine / doesn't have a high compression design then with either 92 or 95 Octane its making the same amount of power.

I agree both of you, it may be the Placebo effect........

Anyways the compression ration of Eclipse cross is 10:1. However, I am not sure how the Direct and Multiport injection happens (on demand basis or not) in this engine and may be the performance has something to do with it...

 

Interestingly in CHR 1.2 L 8NR-FTS also 10:1. 

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I use octane 92 for my 2018 CHR AWD.  I change engine oil with Toyota Motor Oil 0W20 every 5000Km.  Now the mileage is 33k.  No issues or any sign of carbon deposition in tail pipe. It runs smoothly. I pump fuel from only one place which I've been doing for years. 

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Regarding the compression ratio and fuel quality....

I found some information from the web that Vehicle Producers like Peogeot (PSA group) adjust their vehcle compression ratio considering the region. 

Quote form the Article "The compression ratio for countries with poor fuel quality has been adjusted to 9.6:1 to ensure reliability at full load".This is for the 1.2 L puretech engine that comes with 3008. So, we may have to trust Agent imports when considering Euros....

To meet strict environmental regulations, the same engine goes for UK market with 11: 1 compression ratio....:)

 

I am not sure about Japanese  vehicle manufacturers adopt similar strategy when exporting to different countries...Perhaps may be, thats why the OCT 95 is recommended for some countries....:)

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My Ford Focus with 1L Eco-boost engine is also 10:1 and Petrol tank lid says 95 Octane or higher. Ford also gives different specs according to the region (normal condition, warm condition and hot condition), Sri Lanka, Australia, Africa etc. are considered as warm condition.

However it seems the compression ratio of this engine is same in all the regions and recommend fuel is 95 or higher.

Not sure why they recommend 95 where CHR engine with same compression ration can run 92.

 

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1 hour ago, tbird said:

My Ford Focus with 1L Eco-boost engine is also 10:1 and Petrol tank lid says 95 Octane or higher. Ford also gives different specs according to the region (normal condition, warm condition and hot condition), Sri Lanka, Australia, Africa etc. are considered as warm condition.

However it seems the compression ratio of this engine is same in all the regions and recommend fuel is 95 or higher.

Not sure why they recommend 95 where CHR engine with same compression ration can run 92.

 

Perhaps other mechanisms of targeting fuel efficiency and less emissions may require high octane.....

Yeah...region based recommendations of Octane number for CHR is puzzling to me!!!

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38 minutes ago, vitz said:

image.thumb.png.190492d320021808ea7d8e5e3bedd36e.pngHere we go..... UK specs of Mitsubishi Eclipse cross require RON 95 or above fuel.......But Japanese one specifies regular gasoline.....

 

Well a high compression engine setup for higher octane fuel can safely run on lower octane with zero issues.  It doesn't affect the engine either as the knock sensor will compensate for early detonation by retarding / changing the spark ignition pattern...But unless the engine is set up for higher octane fuel (with the proper ecu programming in addition to the proper hardware), pumping higher octane fuel won't help. 

However @vitz if the engine is a higher compression engine that has been detuned ( remapped/ ecu reprogrammed) to run on lower octane for the SL market, you can get the ecu reprogrammed with the ecu mapping for the higher octane fuel map quite easily. That will then, allow you to reap the full benefits of pumping in higher octane...

Edited by Kavvz
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17 minutes ago, Kavvz said:

Well a high compression engine setup for higher octane fuel can safely run on lower octane with zero issues.  It doesn't affect the engine either as the knock sensor will compensate for early detonation by retarding / changing the spark ignition pattern...but unless the engine is set up for higher octane fuel, pumping higher octane fuel won't help. 

However @vitz if the engine is a higher compression engine that has been detuned ( remapped/ ecu reprogrammed) to run on lower octane for the SL market, you can get the ecu reprogrammed with the ecu mapping for the higher octane fuel map quite easily. That will then allow you to reap the full benefits of pumping in higher octane...

@Kavvz Thanks for the information....is there a upper ceiling of compression ratio to call it as a higher compression ratio?

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On 8/16/2020 at 12:02 AM, vitz said:

with 0W20 engine oil changed in every 7500 km

Do you use this below oil?

Is it full synthetic?

I serviced my car today at Toyota Lanka and changed engine oil after 6000km. The guy who changed the engine oil told me existing oil is not in good condition. (Cannot go up to 7500km). I changed oil last time using exact same oil in this photo. I'm using the car in normal Kurunegala traffic. Why he said that? Is he correct or does he not know about oil?

 

 

On 6/18/2020 at 1:13 PM, Shehan_Desha said:

Oil.thumb.jpg.d604ccd5e9d253abdd7db58395359e09.jpg

I'm using 2017 vitz. In first service at CarePoint they applied above shown motor oil. 
They recommended 5000km service routine.
I'm wondering , for synthetic motor oil can i do more that ?

 

Edited by Sadeepa Dilhara
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1 hour ago, vitz said:

@Kavvz Thanks for the information....is there a upper ceiling of compression ratio to call it as a higher compression ratio?

Not sure @vitz, generally 10:1 and above are considered high compression. 

But to a large extent I guess it depends on the engine builder and what what the internal engine components can withstand / what the engine design is. 

For example on the sedans setup for 95 and above octane I know MB has compression ratios around 10.5 : 1 &  11:1 while their AMG engines are built with  a 11.5:1 compression ratio. 

But then again, even with specialized pistons and a longer stroke Barbus only uses a compression ratio of 8.5:1 on the modified M279 MB engine they utilize in the Barbus900. And that engine is vastly superior to the stock engine its based on, so I guess compression ratio isn't everything...

Edited by Kavvz
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