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Switching To A Diesel


nilakicha
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Hi Guys,

Im not sure whether this topic has been discussed already, but I want to get your opinion about it nonetheless to lay to rest a thought I have.

I'm considering switching to a Diesel manual vehicle - preferably a medium saloon (though Cedric's and Crown's have caught my attention big time).

What are the pro's and con's like owning a Diesel manual - and I mean strictly, Manual - AUTO's are out!

Right now, I'm in a ES8 VTI which is good but considering the possibility of running 12+kmpl & the possibility of doing around 260-280 clicks for Rs.2000/- thats a far cry from what it would cost me for petrol for a week.

Cheers

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Well, i cant talk for jap diesels, but most modern euro diesels from the late nineties are quite economical. Especially the bimmers and mercs. For example my car which is a 2004 bimmer, gives me about 14/km per liter. I do about 700+Km for a full tank of diesel(Rs. 5,500 worth of super diesel). With my running on this car, its about one full tank once every two months :jumping-smiley-013:

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well diesel are by default quite economical i think

i run a ford diesel truck and it does 12+ in colombo with ac

downside of diesels is poor acceleration when compared to a petrol

it's something that i really miss coming off a manual petrol car.

Also your regular service cost is a little higher

when engine overhauling time comes...that too is far more expensive with a diesel.

if you're into a lot of traveling about...a diesel is really economical :D

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Well, i cant talk for jap diesels, but most modern euro diesels from the late nineties are quite economical. Especially the bimmers and mercs. For example my car which is a 2004 bimmer, gives me about 14/km per liter. I do about 700+Km for a full tank of diesel(Rs. 5,500 worth of super diesel). With my running on this car, its about one full tank once every two months :jumping-smiley-013:

I don't mind a Bimmer at all, considering I had a 1.9Tdi A4 once, but had to let go of, cos I nearly had to let go of an arm and a leg to have it serviced or a big repair which was nearly around.

That's my question overall, I know the returns are usually good especially on TDI engines. Catch is, cost of ownership i.e. how often I need to service it, what issues should I look for besides Injectors and Air Flow sensors, basically to get at, whether it really is a good option to switch to a Diesel right now, or to stick with the VTI.

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I see the topic description says low weekly running among other reasons.

I say, if running is low, then best would be a petrol considering the initial cost of ownership, high service costs, high repair costs and if it calls, frequent engine re-builds compared to a petrol. I've had lots of diesels and as ripper said, it's really cheap/worth and breaks even when you have lots to run around also diesel motors should keep occupied to be in perfect health, or else if you tend to keep it idling without even starting for few days then the initial starting might be difficult as it demands a good charge in the battery, carbon build ups coz of not being used often or short runs always result in partially burnt diesel particles inside the chamber so carbon build up of the valves and chamber would be high, frequent issues in injector nozzles also can be expected if the diesel tend to keep idling than in use.

do a comparison of cost factors considering all including engine re-build with the petrol and see how many kilometers should you run to break even. If the figure is within the range you run per month, decide against a petrol, but keep in mind that driving pleasure and ride comfort are also compromised (except for some exclusive diesels running about)

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I don't mind a Bimmer at all, considering I had a 1.9Tdi A4 once, but had to let go of, cos I nearly had to let go of an arm and a leg to have it serviced or a big repair which was nearly around.

That's my question overall, I know the returns are usually good especially on TDI engines. Catch is, cost of ownership i.e. how often I need to service it, what issues should I look for besides Injectors and Air Flow sensors, basically to get at, whether it really is a good option to switch to a Diesel right now, or to stick with the VTI.

Maybe go back to an A4 TDI? or maybe an A6? There now is a very good independent place that specializes in VW/Audi Products. Getting work done there is several orders of magnitude less costly than the agents and they have direct parts imports as well. Anyway parts for VAG products are now available from a couple of different sources here, most anything you need can now be found.

Edited by Supra_Natural
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Most of the issues with traditional diesel engines have been eliminated by the new common rail diesel engines. Most euro's since around the early 2000's and japs since around the 2004/05 comes with common rail diesels. My 2.0liter diesel gives around 150 bhp and a torque of around 330 N.M . So many issues such as poor acceleration, black smoke and diesel clatter has been eliminated by these CR diesel engines.

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if the decision is made purely on cost, then it all boils down to how much you run it per year. typically (due to higher tax) a diesel vehicle will cost much higher than the petrol vehicle of the same make.

hypothetically, assuming the diesel vehicle is priced about 500,000 more than the petrol, and if you hypothetically assume both the diesel and petrol will have similar fuel consumption, and also assuming that current price difference in fuel cost to remain (with a liter of petrol being abt Rs. 40 more than diesel)....

to break-even you need to pump (500000/40) = 12,500 liters of diesel.

so at 10 kmpl that's about 125,000 kms. assuming you keep it for 3 years, if you run more than 42,000 km per year, go for a diesel...

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Agreed. CRD technology's the best to go with power/fuel consumption taken to consideration. But the point comes up again with regard to servicing - i.e. I take it to a garage, most often than not, mechanics would look like they've seen a ghost the moment engine bay is shown to them and quote " Apo mahaththaya, mekata atha thiyanna baa, api danne naa mewa monawada kiyalawath" - this the response I got when I wanted a simple check up in the A4 1.9Tdi.

Only one place down Saranankara Road gave some decent advice on what to do. That be the main fear I have, cos i dont want to be hunting for mechanics or decent garage's to get it checked.

What say?

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Agreed. CRD technology's the best to go with power/fuel consumption taken to consideration. But the point comes up again with regard to servicing - i.e. I take it to a garage, most often than not, mechanics would look like they've seen a ghost the moment engine bay is shown to them and quote " Apo mahaththaya, mekata atha thiyanna baa, api danne naa mewa monawada kiyalawath" - this the response I got when I wanted a simple check up in the A4 1.9Tdi.

Only one place down Saranankara Road gave some decent advice on what to do. That be the main fear I have, cos i dont want to be hunting for mechanics or decent garage's to get it checked.

What say?

Well when it comes a euro its always better to go to the agents, a specialist or a DIY if capable. With so many available sources to get down parts, you can save a lot. I sometimes save in excess of 60% off quoted prices by agents by getting down parts personally. And most of these sites send u items within 7 days.

Well it all boils down to what u expect off a car. If its purely economy and a mode of transportation then euro's arnt going to fit your bill.

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If you want a diesel, and your primary consideration is ease of getting it fixed, as in being able to take it to any old garage and they will know what to do, your best option is to go for a car which uses the Toyota 2C engine. It's so standard across many models and so widely used in Sri Lanka, you would never struggle to find parts or expertise on it. Of course the 2C is an old school diesel and not as refined as a common rail.

Priorities, priorities !

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