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Premium Petrol...


rosh78
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Hi Friends,

I'm Using Toyota Vitz 1000cc..

currently i'm using normal octane 90 petrol.

but i like to use premium Petrol (IOC) and see any difference.

Did anyone use it before? if so please mention your experience.

I have a problem before move on to that.

when i fill my fuel tank it will hold up to 2-3L of petrol.

is it ok to mix premium petrol with normal octane 90 petrol.

if not how should i do it?

Thank you friends...

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Why don't you try washing the tank before doing that?? Or run the car till tank empties and walk upto the next IOC petrol shed? <_<

Dude, its just petrol, if you mix both, maybe octane rating might go down a bit (if its 95 Octane), your car wont explode i guess, pump and see...

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I use IOC Xtra Premium. I think it is 92 octane. Gives me smooth acceleration. No mileage gains. I will not switch back to 90 octane unless there is a big difference in price (presently only 4rps).

I dont think there is any issue if you have 2-3 liters of 90 octane when you are switching to Premium. I think I had around 10 liters when I did mine. No problems.

Cheers !

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Hi Friends,

I'm Using Toyota Vitz 1000cc..

currently i'm using normal octane 90 petrol.

but i like to use premium Petrol (IOC) and see any difference.

Did anyone use it before? if so please mention your experience.

I have a problem before move on to that.

when i fill my fuel tank it will hold up to 2-3L of petrol.

is it ok to mix premium petrol with normal octane 90 petrol.

if not how should i do it?

Thank you friends...

Mixing two grades of petrol is not a problem at all mate. Its up to you, but IMHO it`s just a waste to pump high octane petrol on a 1000cc car designed to run on normal unleaded fuel. Dont have hopes on being able to feel a difference. I dont know whether IOC Premium is more cleaner or whether any extra additives are added though, but the fact that the octane is higher wont` make a noticeable difference.

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Why don't you try washing the tank before doing that?? Or run the car till tank empties and walk upto the next IOC petrol shed? <_<

Dude, its just petrol, if you mix both, maybe octane rating might go down a bit (if its 95 Octane), your car wont explode i guess, pump and see...

Yes. My friend has gone up to 85Km on his reserve on 1000C Vitz. And walk to the next petrol shed. <_<

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I use IOC Xtra Premium. I think it is 92 octane. Gives me smooth acceleration. No mileage gains. I will not switch back to 90 octane unless there is a big difference in price (presently only 4rps).

I dont think there is any issue if you have 2-3 liters of 90 octane when you are switching to Premium. I think I had around 10 liters when I did mine. No problems.

Cheers !

Adey I thought I was the only one. When I pumped premium into my car, I gained 200 BHP. Seriously 92 octane will only perform better if your engine was designed for it.

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Adey I thought I was the only one. When I pumped premium into my car, I gained 200 BHP. Seriously 92 octane will only perform better if your engine was designed for it.

My 2.0L stock engine does perform better now, compared to running it with 90.

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Higher the octane, higher the flash point.

Run the lowest octane you can get away with. Higher octane does not improve performance. It is a myth.

fifth gear once did a dyno run with different cars on high octane gas and normal gas.

the econo boxes didn't have any gains whatsoever but the more performance driven car had a significant HP increase with premium gas.

Can't remember all three car models they tested but there was an sti9 that had a significant increase with premium gas

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fifth gear once did a dyno run with different cars on high octane gas and normal gas.

the econo boxes didn't have any gains whatsoever but the more performance driven car had a significant HP increase with premium gas.

Can't remember all three car models they tested but there was an sti9 that had a significant increase with premium gas

I think thats not so much a gain on premium as much as a power loss on regular. The higher performance cars are tuned for that higher flash point, when you pump fuel at ignites at a lower point, it detonates early, retarding the power output from the engine.

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Hi Friends,

I'm Using Toyota Vitz 1000cc..

currently i'm using normal octane 90 petrol.

but i like to use premium Petrol (IOC) and see any difference.

Did anyone use it before? if so please mention your experience.

I have a problem before move on to that.

when i fill my fuel tank it will hold up to 2-3L of petrol.

is it ok to mix premium petrol with normal octane 90 petrol.

if not how should i do it?

Thank you friends...

you wont notice any significant increase in power, higher octane fuel is only recommended for cars that have a higher compressing ratio. If your manufacturer hasnt recommended 95 ocatane its pointless pumping it.Also i would advice you to stay away from IOC Xtra premium, its not required by your vehicle. the only advantage you will have is that it will clean your injectors because it has an injector cleaning fluid. But its better to add a separate Injector cleaner rather than a mix of everything.

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Just outta curiosity, is 95 Octane 'cleaner' than 90? A telltale sign being the exhausts being cleaner? <_< Switching between 90 and 95 shouldn't be a problem right?

http://www.lankaioc.net/spec/Petrol90.pdf

http://www.lankaioc.net/spec/Petrol95.pdf

See for yourself and try to figure it out, looks like greek to me :P

NO there isnt any issue in switching to 95 in a car that was recommended to use 90, its just that it wont be of much use.But switching to 90 on a car that was recommended to use 95 would cause knocking in the engine.

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-efficiency/fuel-consumption/question90.htm

Octane is not about purity, octane is an anti knocking additive. 95 ocatane can be compressed much more without knocking happening as opposed to 90 which will start knocking if the compression rating of the engine is high.Simply put it the more octane you have the more you can compress and the more power you have.

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you wont notice any significant increase in power, higher octane fuel is only recommended for cars that have a higher compressing ratio. If your manufacturer hasnt recommended 95 ocatane its pointless pumping it.

True. And as i have heard, most Jap-spec cars are built for 100-octane, coz that's what sold there

Edited by shanX
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NO there isnt any issue in switching to 95 in a car that was recommended to use 90, its just that it wont be of much use.But switching to 90 on a car that was recommended to use 95 would cause knocking in the engine.

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-efficiency/fuel-consumption/question90.htm

Ah ok, thanks for the link. I was told once that going from 90 to 95 meant you had to clean the tank and some other components... was wondering why. So the purity level (if there is such a thing here) remains the same?

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Ah ok, thanks for the link. I was told once that going from 90 to 95 meant you had to clean the tank and some other components... was wondering why. So the purity level (if there is such a thing here) remains the same?

I dont think so AFAIK, again im not an expert on this :)

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True. And as i have heard, most Jap-spec cars are built for 100-octane, coz that's what sold there

Nop bro... Japan has Regular (90~92OCT) or then Premium Fuels (95~+), but all the JDMs are meant to be run on Regular 90~92 OCT fuels. Only high compression engines require Hi OCT..basically its depend on RON.. jus open the fuel lid...and Voila ! u'll see wot it gotta be filled..

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Ah ok, thanks for the link. I was told once that going from 90 to 95 meant you had to clean the tank and some other components... was wondering why. So the purity level (if there is such a thing here) remains the same?

RON number has nothing to do with cleaner or purer petrol. Meaning that 95 is no less or more cleaner than 90. Its a misconception. High octane numbers are needed in certain engines to stop pre-detonation.

Octane rating does not relate to the energy content of the fuel (see heating value). It is only a measure of the fuel's tendency to burn in a controlled manner, rather than exploding in an uncontrolled manner. Where the octane number is raised by blending in ethanol, energy content per volume is reduced.

It is possible for a fuel to have a Research Octane Number (RON) greater than 100, because iso-octane is not the most knock-resistant substance available. Racing fuels, avgas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and alcohol fuels such as methanol may have octane ratings of 110 or significantly higher. Typical "octane booster" gasoline additives include MTBE, ETBE, isooctane and toluene. Lead in the form of tetra-ethyl lead was once a common additive, but since the 1970s, its use in most of the industrialised world has been restricted, and its use is currently limited mostly to aviation gasoline.

Higher octane ratings correlate to higher activation energies. Activation energy is the amount of energy necessary to start a chemical reaction. Since higher octane fuels have higher activation energies, it is less likely that a given compression will cause autoignition.

It might seem odd that fuels with higher octane ratings are used in more powerful engines, since such fuels ignite less easily. However, an uncontrolled ignition is not desired in a spark ignition engine.

A fuel with a higher octane rating can be run at a higher compression ratio without causing detonation. Compression is directly related to power and to thermodynamic efficiency (see engine tuning), so engines that require higher octane usually deliver more motive power and do more work for a given BTU or calorie of fuel. Engine power is a function of the fuel, as well as the engine design, and is related to octane rating of the fuel. Power is limited by the maximum amount of fuel-air mixture that can be forced into the combustion chamber. When the throttle is partially open, only a small fraction of the total available power is produced because the manifold is operating at pressures far below atmospheric. In this case, the octane requirement is far lower than when the throttle is opened fully and the manifold pressure increases to atmospheric pressure, or higher in the case of supercharged or turbocharged engines.

Many high-performance engines are designed to operate with a high maximum compression, and thus demand high-octane premium gasoline. A common misconception is that power output or fuel mileage can be improved by burning higher octane fuel than specified by the engine manufacturer. The power output of an engine depends in part on the energy density of its fuel, but similar fuels with different octane ratings have similar density. Because switching to a higher octane fuel does not add more hydrocarbon content or oxygen, the engine cannot produce more power.

However, burning fuel with a lower octane rating than required by the engine often reduces power output and efficiency one way or another. If the engine begins to detonate, that reduces power and efficiency for the reasons stated above. Many modern car engines feature a knock sensor – a small piezoelectric microphone which detects knock, and then sends a signal to the engine control unit to retard the ignition timing. Retarding the ignition timing reduces the tendency to detonate, but also reduces power output and fuel efficiency. Because of these systems, under certain conditions of high load and high temperature, a given car may produce more power with a higher octane fuel. With a lower octane fuel, these engines systems will be reducing power to control detonation, while with a higher octane fuel, the engine will produce full power. And some modern high performance engines are actually optimized for higher than pump premium (93 AKI in the US). The 2001 - 2007 BMW M3 with the S54 engine is one such car. Car and Driver magazine dyno tested a car and found that the power output increased as the AKI was increased up to approximately 96 AKI. Also, these systems can result in higher fuel mileage for cars designed for the higher octane fuels.

Most fuel stations have two storage tanks (even those offering 3 or 4 octane levels), and you are given a mixture of the higher and lower octane fuel for the intermediate grades. Premium is fuel from the higher octane tank, and the minimum grade sold is fuel from the lower octane tank. Purchasing 91 (where offered) simply means more fuel from the higher octane tank than purchasing 89; the detergents in the fuel are often identical. But for some producers, the additive package is different between the higher and lower octane rating.

The octane rating was developed by chemist Russell Marker at the Ethyl Corporation c1926. The selection of n-heptane as the zero point of the scale was due to the availability of very high purity n-heptane, not mixed with other isomers of heptane or octane, distilled from the resin of the Jeffrey Pine. Other sources of heptane produced from crude oil contain a mixture of different isomers with greatly differing ratings, which would not give a precise zero point.

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http://www.lankaioc....ec/Petrol90.pdf

http://www.lankaioc....ec/Petrol95.pdf

See for yourself and try to figure it out, looks like greek to me :P

Did you notice they've only changed the min RON number for both 90 and 95 oct? laugh.gif A lot more subtle differences should exist between the two fuels, looks like they haven't even bothered testing and just copied some values from another place and published.

True. And as i have heard, most Jap-spec cars are built for 100-octane, coz that's what sold there

Atleast all JDM GDI engines are designed for 100 octane

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These specification sheets are BS.

To increase octane rating of petrol, either you have to add benzene, tetra-ethyl lead, toluene, iso-octane or something similar. From the specification sheets it looks like LIOC uses benzene as the additive. You can't have octane 95 and octane 90 with the same amount of benzene. 95 should have higher amount of benzene cos there's no mention of toluene or any other additive.

However what I'm bloody shocked to see is that IOC petrol contains a frigging 8% Benzene, which is a known carcinogen (hello, lung cancer!). In most of the countries, benzene is not used any more as the additive for petrol and the benzene content in petrol shouldn't exceed 1%.

I bet Ceypetco fuels aren't any better with the benzene volume.

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Did you notice they've only changed the min RON number for both 90 and 95 oct? laugh.gif A lot more subtle differences should exist between the two fuels, looks like they haven't even bothered testing and just copied some values from another place and published.

These specification sheets are BS.

To increase octane rating of petrol, either you have to add benzene, tetra-ethyl lead, toluene, iso-octane or something similar. From the specification sheets it looks like LIOC uses benzene as the additive. You can't have octane 95 and octane 90 with the same amount of benzene. 95 should have higher amount of benzene cos there's no mention of toluene or any other additive.

However what I'm bloody shocked to see is that IOC petrol contains a frigging 8% Benzene, which is a known carcinogen (hello, lung cancer!). In most of the countries, benzene is not used any more as the additive for petrol and the benzene content in petrol shouldn't exceed 1%.

I bet Ceypetco fuels aren't any better with the benzene volume.

Guys forgive me for my ignorance as i did not pay much attention to the board in the chemistry class,was engaged otherwise :mosking:

So what exactly should be the proper benzine content in 95 octane ?

Also i have heard that there is a difference in measurement between US octane ratings and here, is that true ?

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Guys forgive me for my ignorance as i did not pay much attention to the board in the chemistry class,was engaged otherwise :mosking:

So what exactly should be the proper benzine content in 95 octane ?

Also i have heard that there is a difference in measurement between US octane ratings and here, is that true ?

You are obviously aware that octane is added to prevent engine knocking. There are many ways to increase the octane rating in petrol. The oldest method was to add benzene, which increases the octane rating. When people realized than benzene is carcinogenic, they switched to tetra-ethyl lead. Tetra-ethyl lead was a toxic compound which could cause lead poisoning. There was a global move to phase out leaded fuel. Many countries adopted additives like iso-octane and Ether. I believe Ether is added in most of the developed nations as the additive.

Some of the poorer countries went back to adding benzene because its cheaper. Apparently Sri Lanka is one of them.

US standards say that there should be less than 1% benzene in petrol (or gasoline as they call it). And they are going to reduce this number to around 0.6% sometime in the future. Going by this standard, less than 1% benzene in petrol should be a reasonable figure.

US uses Anti Knock Index (AKI) and most of the rest of the world uses Research Octane Number (RON). Basic difference is RON is measured on an engine at a lower RPM than AKI.

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