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When to change timing belt


ThushanthaSrimal
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Usually no symptoms until one fine day you will find yourself stranded in the middle of the road. Your engine - a D15B series - is an interference type engine, meaning once the belt snaps off the piston heads would hit on the valves resulting in damage. So if you are not sure when the belt was last changed, change it now along with the tensioner wheel before it is too late.

Edit: MAke sure you paste a sticker on the T-belt cover with date and the mileage.

Edited by Rumesh88
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Hi everyone,

Using this old thread for a question,

Well the issue is I am reaching 80,000km on a L200 (Di-d  2014 YOM 4D56U CRDI engine)  and thus need a timing belt change along the way,

When inquiring from the agents the belt itself costs a reasonable 10,000 bucks whereas they recommend a complete redo of all mechanical bits relating to the belt, pulleys, tensioners, seals so on leading to about 70,000 bucks excluding labour. This is without even looking at the vehicle.

The vehicle barely carries any load, but just used to make long distance runs owing to approx 500km a week, driven fairly fast, with Auto Transmission and Super select 4wd

My question is this really necessary or just would just replacing the belt proper suffice?

Edited by tiv
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Its hard to say without actually looking at the vehicle. I believe this might be one of those cases where if it is out you might as well so everything in one go, some used to even replace the water pump during timing belt swaps. Personally I think things like pullies can last a lot more...seals and the tensioner can go either way, but most probably don't need it. Would they give you an option where you replace things only if needed after inspection. 

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20 hours ago, iRage said:

Its hard to say without actually looking at the vehicle. I believe this might be one of those cases where if it is out you might as well so everything in one go, some used to even replace the water pump during timing belt swaps. Personally I think things like pullies can last a lot more...seals and the tensioner can go either way, but most probably don't need it. Would they give you an option where you replace things only if needed after inspection. 

Well sadly they say otherwise, spoke to my trusty mechanic for over 20 years, he too says needs tensioner and pulley changes so on

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3 hours ago, tiv said:

Well sadly they say otherwise, spoke to my trusty mechanic for over 20 years, he too says needs tensioner and pulley changes so on

Pulley ? As in cam pulley ? and Timing belt pulley (the one at the crank) ? Really ? Never heard that. 

Tensioner, like I said can go either way.

EDIT : Or are you referring to the idler pulley ? In which case I can see why...but didn't think the tensioner and idler pulley costs that much

Edited by iRage
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The tensioner is essentially an adjustable pulley, so maybe that's what they're referring to. However, depending on the design of the engine, there can be one or more pulleys that are used to limit or narrow the gap between two adjacent sprockets. @tiv, I believe the agent has a timing belt repair kit that consists of the pulleys, oil seals and the belt itself. This is probably what is priced at 70K. It wouldn't hurt to use genuine parts and use a repair kit to do a proper repair for something like the timing belt. 

The oil seals and pulleys are there in the kit as preventive maintenance. If the old oil seals leak and lube up the sprockets enough to cause the belt to slip by just one tooth, then that could be the end of it. Similar story with the tensioner (+pulley). The weakest link in the chain is usually what gives way, and an old pulley just might be that. 

Have you considered ordering the kit from amayama or partsouq and then getting your mechanic to do the repair? Might be a lot more economical. 

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20 hours ago, Davy said:

The tensioner is essentially an adjustable pulley, so maybe that's what they're referring to. However, depending on the design of the engine, there can be one or more pulleys that are used to limit or narrow the gap between two adjacent sprockets. @tiv, I believe the agent has a timing belt repair kit that consists of the pulleys, oil seals and the belt itself. This is probably what is priced at 70K. It wouldn't hurt to use genuine parts and use a repair kit to do a proper repair for something like the timing belt. 

The oil seals and pulleys are there in the kit as preventive maintenance. If the old oil seals leak and lube up the sprockets enough to cause the belt to slip by just one tooth, then that could be the end of it. Similar story with the tensioner (+pulley). The weakest link in the chain is usually what gives way, and an old pulley just might be that. 

Have you considered ordering the kit from amayama or partsouq and then getting your mechanic to do the repair? Might be a lot more economical. 

Yes....sometimes you have the actual "tensioning" pulley and the idling/gap pulley. I realized/remembered that in SL people refer to the tension pulley as the "tensioner" and the idling pulley as just a pulley.

Again this is one of those agent mysteries....I replaced the timing belt on the Corolla wagon and the dealer didn't replace the tension pulley. The only seals that were changed were seals of the cover (infact even the kits did not have oil seals in them if I remember correct..so probably has to do with the engine) and some O-ring of a hydraulic tensioner. However, when I got the timing belt parts for the Trueno they asked that I replace the tension pulley along with some springs and an oil seal and plate like thing for the crank-shaft end (again, crank pulley itself was not asked to be changed; I have no idea why they didn't ask to change the cam side seals...). So makes me wonder if the tension/idling pulley/pullies are based on mileage or age, again presuming they go by just doing what the maintenance manual says and nothing more and nothing less in typical agent-fashion. 

Also, its amazing that the kit gets so expensive in SL (nearly 500USD..probably thanks to taxes and margins for the dealer). The timing belt cost something like 10,000yen, the pulley was like 4000yen and the seals were another 1000 yen or something. So all in all, it was like 16500yen in total (about 120 USD?). 

Edited by iRage
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